recipe book

Hearty Adaptable Soup-Stew with Turmeric - Low-FODMAP recipe

A winter-warmer I’ve been eating at any given opportunity. Although the recipe seems like a very basic vegetable soup, the herbs and spices all have their nutritional place.

I deliberately don’t add the ‘protein of choice’ until the end. You can portion up the soup and freeze for quick, filling lunches. By adding your protein just before serving, you can ring the changes and have a different lunch each time; simply re-heat the soup-stew and stir in. We still have air-dried ham leftover from Christmas which I diced up to use for the picture. You can of course use a mixture of several proteins. I hope you will experiment and see how adaptable this soup is!

Serves 6

1 litre stock chicken, beef or vegetable stock or if you have some, bone broth.

1 tbsp. coconut oil

240g carrots, peeled and diced

220g parsnips, peeled and diced

Thyme, 5 sprigs

440g potato, peeled and diced (all rounders, such as Desiree)

2 tomatoes, each cut into 8

3 sage leaves, shredded

½ tsp. ground black pepper

¼ tsp. sea salt flakes

3 sage leaves shredded

½ tsp. turmeric

Very large handful of curly leaf parsley finely chopped (30g of leaves)

 

The following measures are given per person. Add to heat through, before serving.

70g chopped, cooked chicken, beef, ham, turkey or pork

46g well rinsed, canned lentils

42g well rinsed, canned chickpeas

40g air-dried ham

 

Warm the coconut oil in a large pan over a medium high heat. Add the carrots, parsnips and thyme sprigs, and cook for 3 minutes, stirring regularly. Add the potatoes, tomatoes, sage, turmeric, pepper and salt before cooking and stirring for a further 2 minutes, making sure it doesn’t catch on the bottom of the pan. Stir in stock, cover and bring to the boil before turning down to a simmer for 20 minutes. Remove the woody thyme stalks. The soup will be cooked now but if it needs to stand for a while, it won’t harm, the flavours will simply mellow together.

If you are freezing this, stir in the parsley and cool fully before portioning it up. If you are serving now, add your chosen protein to heat through and stir in the parsley at the last minute.

Low-FODMAP servings

Parsnip - Eat freely and according to appetite – suggested serving 62g.

Carrot – Eat freely and according to appetite – suggested serving 61g.

Potato - Eat freely and according to appetite – suggested serving 122g.

Tomato – Common, eat freely and according to appetite – suggested serving 119g.

Canned chickpeas – 42g

Canned lentils – 46g

Meat is high in protein and does not contain carbohydrates. Check ingredients of processed meats for high-FODMAP ingredients.

Perfect Roast Potatoes and Parsnips - low-FODMAP, gluten-free, crispy and golden.

A perfect roast potato is for life, not just for Christmas. I make my low-FODMAP roasties a little more festive by adding parsnips – this can help your Christmas cooking schedule, as you just need one roasting tray. Although I enjoy a maple roast parsnip as much as the next glutton, I find maple is one flavour too many on an already rich and flavourful Christmas plate. Both parsnips and potatoes have the Monash listing of 'FODMAPs were not detected in this food. Eat freely and according to appetite' - there you go guys, get roasting!

Perfect low FODMAP Roast Potatoes and Parsnips

 

You can peel and chop the potatoes and parsnips the night before and keep in separate pans of water. Do not soak them together as the parsnips will flavour the potatoes. Soaking the veg will remove some of their starchiness and make for a crispier roast potato. If you wish to be even more prepared, then you can also par-boil the veg the night before. Allow the steam to escape and fully cool before keeping in a cold place. You can substitute sunflower oil for the goose fat but it won’t be as crispy.

So here you are, crispy and golden on the outside, fluffy and sweet inside, I give you my perfect low-FODMAP roast potatoes and parsnips. You can watch my how-to guide here.

 

Serves 6

Prep 15 minutes + 1 hour roasting

1.5kg Maris Piper potatoes

500g parsnips

2 pinches of table salt

5 tablespoons goose fat

Small bunch of thyme

Pinch of sea salt flakes

 

Pre-heat the oven to 200°C/ 185°C Fan oven.

Peel the potatoes and parsnips. Cut the potatoes into similar sized pieces (if you want to be exact, each piece is between 35g and 45g!) Cut the parsnips into similar sized pieces, I usually cut the thick piece into two and the longer stem whole. See my video for a guide. Either soak the potatoes and parsnips in separate pans of cold water overnight or give them a rinse to remove some of the starch.

Change the water in the pans and add a large pinch of salt to each pan. Bring to the boil. Once boiling, boil the parsnips for 4 minutes and the potatoes for 8 minutes. Drain separately in a colander. Allow the veg to cool slightly and the steam to escape. Place the goose fat in a large, heavy-duty roasting tray and pop into the oven for a minute.

Place a lid over the colander and give the potatoes and parsnips and shake to rough up the edges. When the fat is smoking hot remove from the oven. Using a spoon, very carefully add the potatoes and parsnips. Turn everything over in the pan until it is fully coated in goose fat and in one even layer. Scatter the thyme stalks over the top of the potatoes and parsnips and return to the oven for 45 minutes.

After 45 minutes check in on the potatoes and turn over to ensure maximum crispiness. Return to the oven for a further 15 minutes, remove the thyme stalks and place into a warmed dish - I like my potatoes and parsnips to be piled high. Scrunch the sea salt flakes over the top.