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Perfect Roast Potatoes and Parsnips - low-FODMAP, gluten-free, crispy and golden.

A perfect roast potato is for life, not just for Christmas. I make my low-FODMAP roasties a little more festive by adding parsnips – this can help your Christmas cooking schedule, as you just need one roasting tray. Although I enjoy a maple roast parsnip as much as the next glutton, I find maple is one flavour too many on an already rich and flavourful Christmas plate. Both parsnips and potatoes have the Monash listing of 'FODMAPs were not detected in this food. Eat freely and according to appetite' - there you go guys, get roasting!

Perfect low FODMAP Roast Potatoes and Parsnips

 

You can peel and chop the potatoes and parsnips the night before and keep in separate pans of water. Do not soak them together as the parsnips will flavour the potatoes. Soaking the veg will remove some of their starchiness and make for a crispier roast potato. If you wish to be even more prepared, then you can also par-boil the veg the night before. Allow the steam to escape and fully cool before keeping in a cold place. You can substitute sunflower oil for the goose fat but it won’t be as crispy.

So here you are, crispy and golden on the outside, fluffy and sweet inside, I give you my perfect low-FODMAP roast potatoes and parsnips. You can watch my how-to guide here.

 

Serves 6

Prep 15 minutes + 1 hour roasting

1.5kg Maris Piper potatoes

500g parsnips

2 pinches of table salt

5 tablespoons goose fat

Small bunch of thyme

Pinch of sea salt flakes

 

Pre-heat the oven to 200°C/ 185°C Fan oven.

Peel the potatoes and parsnips. Cut the potatoes into similar sized pieces (if you want to be exact, each piece is between 35g and 45g!) Cut the parsnips into similar sized pieces, I usually cut the thick piece into two and the longer stem whole. See my video for a guide. Either soak the potatoes and parsnips in separate pans of cold water overnight or give them a rinse to remove some of the starch.

Change the water in the pans and add a large pinch of salt to each pan. Bring to the boil. Once boiling, boil the parsnips for 4 minutes and the potatoes for 8 minutes. Drain separately in a colander. Allow the veg to cool slightly and the steam to escape. Place the goose fat in a large, heavy-duty roasting tray and pop into the oven for a minute.

Place a lid over the colander and give the potatoes and parsnips and shake to rough up the edges. When the fat is smoking hot remove from the oven. Using a spoon, very carefully add the potatoes and parsnips. Turn everything over in the pan until it is fully coated in goose fat and in one even layer. Scatter the thyme stalks over the top of the potatoes and parsnips and return to the oven for 45 minutes.

After 45 minutes check in on the potatoes and turn over to ensure maximum crispiness. Return to the oven for a further 15 minutes, remove the thyme stalks and place into a warmed dish - I like my potatoes and parsnips to be piled high. Scrunch the sea salt flakes over the top. 

Low-FODMAP Tomato Salad - (Salade de Tomates)

Low-FODMAP Tomato Salad - (Salade de Tomates)

If I was told I couldn’t eat fragrant, ripe, gloriously red tomatoes any longer I think I would cry - I would grieve for them far more than I have for any other food I have had to eliminate on the Low-FODMAP diet. You can keep your Chanel No.5; I think there is no aroma that matches the luscious, verdant smell of a greenhouse full of tomatoes in summer.

How best to celebrate the tomato? With this simple salad of course! A dish that is elegant enough to serve to others but quick enough to knock up for a snatched kitchen supper. Shush, don’t tell anyone the secret ingredient in this salad until after they have eaten. People can be peculiarly snobbish about tomato ketchup.

You can add a torn up ball of buffalo mozzarella to turn this into a more substantial lunch dish. Although I have used extra virgin olive oil here, do try using different oils such as the basil oil or Aromatic Spiced Oil for variety. Use the salad to top The Greatest Garlic Bread to make The Greatest Bruschetta Ever - divine.

I have used the Natural Grey Sea Salt with Herbs de Provence as it feels right that a tomato dish should taste of Provencal sunshine but equally the Natural Grey Sea Salt with Garden Herbs bring you flavours an English country garden. For a yeast-free version, use non-brewed condiment in place of the vinegar.

I use Chippa gluten-free Tomato Ketchup, as it is low-FODMAP, but use any good quality ketchup you can tolerate. For an entirely different smoky flavour – please use the barbeque tomato ketchup from the recipe in my book, Our House For Tea.

Serves 4 as a side dish

Prep – 5-10 minutes

4 large ripe tomatoes, at room temperature

1 tbsp. ketchup

1 tbsp. extra virgin olive oil

1 tsp. white wine vinegar

½ tsp. Natural Grey Sea Salt with Herbs de Provence

¼ tsp. freshly ground black pepper

1 tsp. finely chopped parsley (optional)

Slice the tomatoes horizontally into 5mm slices, cutting out the ‘stalky’ middle nearer the top. For this I use the end of a vegetable peeler. Lay the slices artistically in a shallow dish, putting the less attractive slices on the bottom. Whisk all the remaining ingredients, except the parsley, in a small bowl and pour over the slices in an even layer. If you are using the parsley, scatter it over the top. This salad benefits from standing for 10 minutes to mingle but it is not essential. 

 

Carrot & Walnut Bake for Autumn - low-FODMAP, gluten-free and vegan

Doesn't it scream autumn?

Doesn't it scream autumn?

Autumn weather is confusing this year and it’s confusing my usual autumn Low-FODMAP menu. Daddy-long-legs are drunkenly drifting about in the sunshine wondering what to do with themselves next. The apple tree has snapped in two under the weight of tiny red apples – as they are not FODMAP friendly I need to give these away – please pop in if you’re interested

I had intended to do something entirely different for teatime yesterday but I had an ingredients disaster and had to look to the store cupboard for salvation. Ras-el-Hanout came to my rescue again and gave a warm spiced pumpkin pie flavour to some decidedly normal carrots. Autumn means walnuts but to stop the flavour becoming too overwhelming I ‘cut’ them with some pumpkin seeds.

A low-FODMAP portion of dried cranberries is 13g so you’ll be within your ‘safe’ limit. Do check the ingredients of your ras-el-Hanout – there shouldn’t be any garlic. I seem to be strewing brown rice breadcrumbs over everything at the moment – I got mine from the local market. Eat for teatime or it slices well cold to have as leftovers.

No-one is more surprised than I that I got it out in one piece!

No-one is more surprised than I that I got it out in one piece!

Serves 4 generously, prep 15-20 mins, baking time 40 mins

1kg carrots, peeled and sliced

160g walnuts

50g pumpkin seeds

30g dried cranberries

Large pinch of salt

Heaped tsp. ras-el-Hanout

Heaped tbsp. brown rice breadcrumbs

Heaped tbsp. sesame seeds

A little olive oil for greasing.Pre-heat an oven to 180°C. Lightly grease a 22cm pie dish.

Cook the carrots either by steaming, microwaving (or boiling, although you will lose some vitamins) until soft. While the carrots are cooking place the walnuts, pumpkin seeds and cranberries into a food processor then blitz to fine crumbs. Tip the nut mixture into a bowl and stir in the ras-el-Hanout and salt.

Drain the carrots really well and allow to cool slightly so the steam can escape. Place the carrots in the food processor (you don’t need to wash it first!) and blitz until nearly smooth. Add the nuts back in and blitz again until everything is thoroughly combined. Press the mixture evenly into the pie dish. I did make a pretty pattern on mine using a spatula but I’m not sure I’d bother next time!

Mix the rice breadcrumbs and sesame seeds together before scattering evenly over the top. Bake for 40 minutes. You may need to loose the edge of the bake with a knife before cutting out wedges.

The Greatest Garlic Bread, that happens to be Gluten-free and Low-FODMAP

The Greatest Garlic Bread, that happens to be Gluten-free and Low-FODMAP

Garlic Bread, gluten-free, low-FODMAP

Since eliminating garlic and gluten from your diet you may be puzzling how or why I’ve given you a recipe for garlic bread? Well, I have developed this recipe because I miss garlic bread as much as you do and some things are worth fighting for. This has held my husband in rapture. Seriously, it’s delicious and should not be over-looked by those with no dietary issues! To turn this into The Greatest Bruschetta ever, cover the pieces of cooked garlic bread with my tomato salad. When the food is this good at Our House For Tea, it makes it very difficult to bother eating out.

The FODMAPs in garlic, Oligo-fructans, are held in the water of the garlic. Science is a wonderful thing for ensuring that oil and water does not mix - oil can be infused with garlic without the oligo-fructans getting in! Consider Garlic Oil your new best friend.

If you can eat gluten, please use a ‘normal’ artisan or sourdough bread. I have cut the bread into 1.5cm wide slices.

Serves 4

Prep – 10 minutes

 

4 slices gluten-free bloomer style bread

4 tbsp. Garlic Oil

40g finely grated pecorino

1 tbsp. finely chopped parsley

¼ tsp. freshly ground black pepper

 

Under a hot grill on a baking sheet, toast the bread on one side, and then remove from the grill. Mix together all the other ingredients in a small bowl.

Spread the untoasted side of the bread with the oil mix, try and be as equal as you can then under the grill. Grill for 3 minutes until the top is looking crisp and the edges are beginning to char.

 

 

THE BEST Low-FODMAP, Gluten-free, Vegan Chocolate-chip Cookies!

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     Gotta catch 'em all!

Gotta catch 'em all!

Please excuse my excitable heading and font – but these really are THE BEST low-FODMAP, gluten-free, vegan chocolate-chip cookies EVER! Anyone who follows my Instagram feed (@ourhousefortea) will have witnessed the baking disasters I’ve created whilst getting to this point. I kept trying to replace the eggs with various ingredients and it was only when I wondered what would happen if I didn’t, that these little beauties emerged. They are crisp on the outside and a bit squishier and crumblier in the middle - perfect. I must confess I’ve had no breakfast but have eaten three cookies in a row… bad low-FODMAP evangelist ;-) Won’t ramble on now and will let you get to the good stuff. I’m just about to try substituting half the chips with crystallised ginger pieces*, will let you know how I get on, promise you’ll tell me how you get on too?

Makes 16 Prep – 10 minutes Baking time – 12-14 minutes

125g free-from sunflower margarine (Pure Sunflower for preference)

75g caster sugar

50g soft light brown sugar

2 tsps. vanilla extract

200g self-raising gluten free flour blend (Doves Farm for preference)

Pinch of salt

1 tsp. baking powder

2 tsps. almond milk

150g dark (semi-sweet) chocolate chips

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   FYI, the raw dough won't do you any harm...

FYI, the raw dough won't do you any harm...

Pre-heat the oven to 170°C. Line two baking sheets with greaseproof baking paper.

Using an electric hand whisk beat together the margarine, sugars and vanilla in a mixing bowl, until light and fluffy. In another bowl, mix the flour, baking powder and salt. Sift flour mix into the margarine and stir until it is combined. (If you use the electric beaters for this stage, the flour will fly everywhere.) When the flour is safely combined, add the almond milk and then whisk until you have a smooth, sticky dough. Stir in the chocolate chips until they are evenly distributed.

Dollop the dough in dessertspoonfuls onto the baking sheet, keeping them well spaced apart. You should have 8 dollops per sheet. Smooth the tops a little with a clean finger until they are around 6cm across.

Bake for 14 minutes, turning the sheets halfway through to ensure they brown evenly. Allow to cool on the tray for 2-3 minutes to harden slightly then move to a wire rack to cool. If you are going to store them, wait until they are cold and store in an airtight container.

Eaten warm, (she says from experience) they are delicious with a glass of milk, or whatever you’re drinking these days that passes for milk. The chips are still a bit soft and the chocolate can travel a surprisingly long way, particularly if for some reason you have it on your elbow. How?!

*Half ginger, half choc chips worked! I also added 1/2 tps. of ground ginger with the flour - delicious!


As a special treat here's a pic of one of my many disasters - follow me on Instagram for more kitchen disasters @ourhousefortea

Hmm...

Hmm...

Cantaloupe Granita - Low-FODMAP and gloriously orange

Low FODMAP Cantaloupe Granita 2

Cantaloupe Granita - Low-FODMAP and gloriously orange

Aside from IBS and accidental-ingestion-of-a FODMAP associated pain, lots of childhood ‘illnesses’ elicit the same response from me. These are responses that can be said with a degree of concern in my voice but without betraying the scepticism I’m feeling. Nothing will quicken the turn of a perceived illness or injury into a full-blown illness, than a child who doesn’t believe you are genuinely concerned.

Low-FODMAP Cantaloupe Granita 1

Child – “Mummy, I’ve got a…”

Me, (in my best concerned voice, wearing my best concerned face) “Oh dear. Have you tried having a glass of water/ going to the loo/ having a little lie-down on the window seat/ putting a wet flannel on it/ opening a window/ running it under a cold tap/ putting on a jumper/ having a bath to relax your muscles/ putting a plaster on it/ not bending your leg/finger/arm backwards?”

Any of these seem familiar?

Heartless I know, but sometimes just having someone acknowledge your stress and pain is all that is needed. Often it turns out the illness/ injury was just a prelude to what has really been bugging them. A bad day at school, an injustice on the playground or disappointment that something didn’t turn out quite as anticipated. I think this is also true for grown-ups. When was the last time someone gave you their best concerned face? A little kindness can go a long way.

Sometimes, the struggle is real and you need to bring down a high temperature. Granita is a great to administer as a cooling-aid. Give 90g of cantaloupe melon granita, safe in the knowledge that you won’t also be tending to FODMAP related pain.

Check out the matching nails ;-)

Check out the matching nails ;-)

Prep - 5-10 minutes,

Freezing time 3 hours.

 1 ripe cantaloupe melon

Juice of half a lime.

Deseed the melon. If you have a hand-held blender, scrape the gorgeously orange flesh and lime-juice into a bowl. You could also use a blender or food processor. Whizz together, taking a moment to enjoy the wonderful perfume and wish you had a nail varnish the same colour.

Pour into a shallow freezer safe container. Cover and freeze. Every 30 minutes scrape in the ice that starts to form around the sides back into the mix, using fork. The mixture will start to get a granular slushy consistency. After 3 hours your granita will be ready.

For a grown-up slushie I recommend a shot of limoncello poured over the top.

If you keep it frozen, it will turn into a solid block. Leave to defrost slightly and show it some welly with either a food processor or blender to loosen things up.

Just realised I've given you a Low-FODMAP, sugar-free, vegan recipe - my life has changed immeasurably since 2012...

 

LowFODMAP Canteloupe Melon Granita 3

Low-FODMAP Smoked Haddock Chowder Recipe (a gluten-free, low-lactose celebration of yellow).

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     Low-FODMAP Smoked Haddock Chowder

Low-FODMAP Smoked Haddock Chowder

When I was at primary school (pre- Low-FODMAP!) I remember having to paint a picture of our favourite on a sugar paper plate. Being a greedy little blighter, my plate had beef pie, spaghetti bolognaise, peas and a pile of yellow fish with yellow sauce. My mum would poach the fish in milk and make a sauce with egg yolks as a sort of savoury custard. So much yellowy-love. In the eighties it was very difficult to get anything other than the dyed smoked-haddock or cod but it’s now easier to find the un-dyed variety. Yes, natural colour is better for us, but can I say I sort of miss the unnatural explosion of colour?

After many years of failure to grow oregano in a pot, I shoved a twig in the ground and now it’s rampaging across the flowerbed. Most of our meals now contain least a tablespoon of fresh oregano in an effort to control the growth, but you can use fresh thyme if that’s what you have.

Serves 4

450g boneless smoked haddock

2 bay leaves

1 tsp. black peppercorns

500ml boiling water

1 tbsp. garlic oil

40g butter or dairy-free spread

1 large green pepper, in 1cm dice

1 corncob.

900g floury potatoes, peeled and in 1.5cm dice

500ml almond milk

1 tbsp. chopped fresh oregano or thyme

Small handful of curly parsley leaves, chopped

Freshly ground black pepper.

In a wide, deep, lidded pan, cover the fish, bay leaves and peppercorns with boiling water. Simmer covered for 5 minutes then remove from the heat to cool slightly.

Using a sharp, heavy knife, cut the kernels from the corncob. Remove the fish from the pan using a slotted spoon. Allow to cool on a plate. Strain the remaining liquid into a measuring jug. Top up the liquid with water to make 500ml. Clean the pan.

Warm the oils and butter in the pan, and then add the pepper and sweetcorn kernels. Cover and allow to soften over a medium high heat, stirring occasionally, for 10 minutes. Add the potato and cook for a further 5 minutes, stirring to prevent sticking. Pour the fishy water over the vegetables and stir in the thyme. Cover and allow to cook for around 10 minutes, until the potatoes are tender.

While the potatoes are cooking, remove any skin or stray bones from the fish and flake with your fingers. When the potatoes are cooked remove from the heat and use a measuring jug to remove 500ml of the vegetables and liquid. Add the almond milk and using a potato masher, mash everything in the pan until there are no lumps of potato left.

Stir the reserved 500ml of 'lumps and liquid' back into the pan with the fish. Bring up to a simmer, stirring occasionally. Taste for seasoning (you may not need any if your fish was salty) and serve in warm bowls with the parsley and black pepper scattered over the top.