fodmap friendly

Slow Cooked Pork Shoulder Steaks with Low-FODMAP Vegetable Sauce

Early spring and slow-cooking go hand in glove. It’s cold and it can sometimes be a struggle to ever remember what it’s like to have a light evenings. In the evening you need a meal to be ready on your return, welcoming you back with its warming aromas. This easy dish is ideal for rice, jacket potatoes, mash or even poured over crusty low-FODMAP bread.

You can use chicken, beef or vegetable stock, do check the ingredients for high FODMAP's if you are not using homemade. If you do not have a slow cooker bake in a heavy lidded casserole at 160°C for 3-4 hours. Use 400ml of stock, checking regularly to make sure it doesn’t dry out.

That's some parsnip puree hiding in the background.

That's some parsnip puree hiding in the background.

Serves 4

1 tbsp. garlic oil

250g carrots

4 pork shoulder steaks (around 600g)

10 sprigs of thyme

480g tomatoes

250ml stock

Large pinch of salt flakes

Freshly ground black pepper to taste.

Peel and slice the carrots. Slice the tomatoes into 4 horizontally. Cut out the stalk from each top slice of each tomato. Warm the oil in a frying pan over a medium high heat. Fry the carrots, stirring often for 3 minutes. Put the carrots in the slow cooker. Fry the shoulder steaks off in the frying pan for one minute each side. Place the steaks on top of the carrots. Add the tomatoes to the frying pan and fry for a minute on each side. Scatter the thyme sprigs and salt flakes over the steaks then cover with the tomatoes. Return the pan to the heat and pour in the stock. Scrape any stuck-on juices from the bottom of the pan into the stock and pour into the slow-cooker.

Cook on low for 8-9 hours. Using a fish slice or slotted spoon, gently lift the steaks out of the vegetables onto a warm plate. They may break up a little but you can reassemble on the plate. Remove the woody thyme sprigs from the vegetables. Using a hand-held blender, whizz up everything left in the slow-cooker until smooth. Season to taste. Serve the steaks with the sauce poured over the top – yum!

Low-FODMAP servings

Common tomato – 119g

Pork –

Garlic Oil - Oil should be infused with garlic to keep the FODMAP’s out!

Thyme, salt, pepper – FODMAP safe

Carrots – FODMAP’s are not detected in this food. Eat freely and according to appetite

 

Low-FODMAP Chocolate and Raspberry Pudding Cakes - gluten-free and vegan recipe.

Ahh, Valentine’s Day. I’m of the mind you shouldn’t restrict your romance and affection to one day a year. However, my daughter has other ideas and feels grand gestures should be compulsory. Therefore, I shall be demonstrating my love and affection to my family by making these low-fodmap, gluten-free, vegan, chocolatey-raspberry treats. In return they can show their love and affection to me by not bickering and doing their homework without me having to nag.

I’m using frozen raspberries as they’re readily available. You need to have 9 fairly good-looking ones for the tops but the others can be a bit battered. When using coconut cream, empty the can or tetrapak into a bowl first and beat with a spoon to thoroughly combine, before weighing out. Any unused cream can be kept in the fridge in an airtight container. Please do not panic if the tops go cracked – they’re going to be smothered in choccy topping. FODMAP friendly portion sizes at the bottom.

Squidgy

Squidgy

Makes 9 cakes

85g gluten-free self-raising flour blend

100g dark 72% chocolate, very finely chopped

85g dairy-free margarine

55g caster sugar

1 tbsp. golden syrup

125ml UHT coconut milk

36 frozen raspberries

160ml coconut cream

Pre-heat a fan oven to 150°C. Line a muffin tin with 9 paper cases and place 3 raspberries in the bottom of each case.

Sift the flour into a bowl and make a well in the middle. In a small pan, melt the margarine, sugar, golden syrup and milk over a low heat. Stir with a wooden spoon as it warms, do not let it get hot. When it no longer feels grainy on the spoon, stir in 30g of the chocolate and remove from the heat. Keep stirring until it is all combined and melted.

Pour the chocolate mixture into the well in the flour and whisk well with a balloon whisk. Pour the batter into a jug then pour over the raspberries, splitting the mixture evenly between all 9 cases. Bake for 25 minutes. When baked, leave to cool in the tin.

Place a tightly fitting heatproof bowl on top of a pan of simmering water. Add the coconut cream and stir until it is smooth and just warm. Stir in the remaining 70g of chocolate until it just starts to melt then remove the pan from the heat. Continue stirring until it is completely smooth. Remove the bowl from the pan and leave to cool for 10 minutes. Whisk for 5 minutes using an electric hand-held whisk.

Keeping the cakes in the tin, spoon the chocolate on the cakes to as near to the top of the cases as you can. Leave to cool and set. Lift the cakes out of the tin using a palette knife. I like to remove the paper cases before serving. Place a ‘good-looking’ raspberry on the top and if you’re feeling fancy, sift over a little icing sugar.

Low FODMAP servings

Dark Chocolate – 30g

Margarine – 19g

Sugar – 14g

Golden Syrup – ½ tbsp.

UHT Coconut milk – 125ml

Raspberries – 10 berries

Coconut cream – not yet tested but it is processed in the same way as coconut milk so it is likely to have a similar results. It’s high fat content means it is possible it could be even lower in FODMAPs

This is a sample of how we do Valentine's Day - Homemade Moomin Cards. Like our family sayings - I have no recollection how we started this but after 16 years we're amassing quite a collection! They no longer look like Moomins but strange creatures that find themselves in a variety of unusual situations. 

This is a sample of how we do Valentine's Day - Homemade Moomin Cards. Like our family sayings - I have no recollection how we started this but after 16 years we're amassing quite a collection! They no longer look like Moomins but strange creatures that find themselves in a variety of unusual situations. 

Buttered Fish Broth - Low-FODMAP recipe

Thankfully butter is low-FODMAP and I feel no fear about throwing it into my food at the slightest opportunity. If you are a ghee advocate then do please substitute for the butter. The benefit of this dish is that it does not require a fish stock. As the hot water reduces it almost emulsifies with the butter to turn it a delicate, primrose yellow. The flavour will intensify as it reduces. As an addendum, I have made this with a frozen fish portions putting the frozen fish straight into the water. I can’t say it has altered the flavour at all, but it has made my life easier when I’ve forgotten to defrost any fish! I’ve given you the recipe for 2 portions, as I’ve realised not all of you are feeding a family of four, but you can easily multiply the recipe. I serve this on its own for a light meal or in a bowl over rice for a main meal, (see picture for both options). If you can find some good low-FODMAP crusty bread, it works as a delicious mop for the yellowy broth. 

In light of the news of vegetable shortages, I've had to rethink this month's recipes! If you cannot find baby spinach, look for some homegrown perpetual spinach. It will need a good wash, tough stems removing and a slightly longer cooking time but will still be terrifically good for you.

Right-hand bowl is without rice, left-hand bowl is with rice

Right-hand bowl is without rice, left-hand bowl is with rice

2 portions of firm white fish such as haddock or cod each weighing between 120g-150g

700ml water

Bay leaf

2 large sprigs of thyme

8 peppercorns

40g butter

120g peeled diced carrot

70g baby leaf spinach

Small handful of basil, shredded

Salt and freshly ground black pepper for seasoning

 

If you are serving with rice, start cooking this while you prepare the broth. Warm two soup bowls.

Place the fish in a medium sized pan with the bay leaf, peppercorns, thyme and water. Bring to the boil, cover and turn down to a simmer for 6-7 minutes, until the fish flakes easily. It is difficult to be exact, as the cooking time will depend on the thickness of the fillet.

Using a slotted spoon, remove the fish from the pan and place in a soup bowl. Skim out and discard the peppercorns and bay leaf from the water. Add the butter and carrots to the pan and bring to the boil, uncovered. Reduce the water by half, stirring occasionally to blend the butter. Meanwhile, flake the fish by hand, removing any skin or bones

When the broth has reduced, stir in the spinach and basil. Cover and allow to wilt for a minute. Remove from the heat. Take out the woody thyme sprigs but leave any thyme leaves. Add the flaked fish back into the pan then taste and adjust the seasoning. If you are using rice, place a portion in each bowl before sharing the broth between the bowls.

Low-FODMAP servings

Fish is high in protein and does not contain carbohydrates.

Butter is high in fat and does not contain carbohydrates.

Carrot – Eat freely and according to appetite – suggested serving 61g.

Spinach – 38g

Basmati rice – 190g (I used 150g of cooked basmati rice as a serving)

Basil – 16g

 

Hot Toddy recipe for cold days and days with colds

Less of a drink, more of a medicine, my hot toddy recipe will have you feeling cosy in no time. Suitable for those occasions when you’re not quite properly poorly but nonetheless, in need of an early night and a blanket. Black peppercorns, ginger, star anise, cinnamon, lemons all have anti-inflammatory, antiseptic or healing properties; the whisky helps you sleep and the spoonful of sugar? Well, it makes the medicine go down!

Hot Toddy recipe low FODMAP

You can miss out the straining stage if you’d prefer but it does make it a little easier to drink! Watch my 'how to' video here.

Makes 1 hot toddy

 

1 whole clove

1 cinnamon stick

½-1tsp brown sugar

1 whole star anise

8 black peppercorns

2 discs of fresh root ginger

1 tsp. lemon juice

6 tbsp. (90ml) almost boiling water

2 tbsp. (30ml) whisky

Slices of unwaxed lemon

Place everything but the whisky and lemon peel in a heatproof glass. Stir with the cinnamon stick until the sugar has dissolved. Allow to stand for 5 minutes. Strain the water into another heatproof glass; add a couple of lemon slices and the whisky, before stirring together with the cinnamon stick. Drink whilst wrapped in a blanket

Sprouts, Courgette & Pancetta - Recipe to stretch your 2 Low-FODMAP sprouts at Christmas

Is there any vegetable more crucial to the Christmas dinner than the humble but unfortunately high FODMAP Brussels sprout? Even those who dislike sprouts see it as vital that there should be sprouts on the table. I am, or was, a great sprout lover but a low-FODMAP safe serving is a measly 2 sprouts. I was left with the riddle of how to make my duo of sprouts go further and seem like I was eating more. Challenge accepted.

It's important they still look sprouty.

It's important they still look sprouty.

Pancetta is a great partner to sprouts; the courgette can bulk up the greenery without overwhelming the sprout flavour. By shredding the sprouts lengthways the leaves should stay together enough to stay recognisable as sprouts. There is a joke about people who put their Christmas sprouts on to boil in October so all you have is a smelly mush. This dish is the antithesis of that meme: it takes minutes to make and can be thrown together just before serving. You can see how quickly it comes together in this video.

Serves 6 as a side dish

Prep – 15 minutes

 

1 tbsp. olive oil

140g diced pancetta

200g courgette diced into 5mm pieces

12 sprouts, sliced thinly lengthways

3 tbsp. water

30g butter

2 tbsp. chopped parsley

Freshly ground black pepper to taste

 

Warm the olive oil in a wide lidded pan over a medium-high heat. Add the pancetta and fry for 3 – 3 ½ minutes, stirring often, until the fat is a golden brown and starting to render down. Throw in the sprouts and courgettes and gently turn over so as not to break up the sprouts.

Add 3 tbsp. of water cover and cook for 4 minutes, stirring occasionally. Add the butter, turn over again and remove from the heat. Gently stir in the parsley and pepper. Remove to a warm serving dish.

 

 

Low-FODMAP Red Cabbage for Christmas - a deep purple recipe

Red cabbage can be difficult to navigate on the Low-FODMAP diet. Although a ‘safe’ serving of red cabbage is 80g, I would struggle with this amount. Whether it’s the fibre or an extreme reaction to the oligo-fructans, any brassica in large quantities can poleaxe me. The reaction does seem slightly less severe when the cabbage is cooked. Also, I really need that deep purple on my Christmas plate. Whether you’re having goose, turkey or ham this slightly aromatic, sweet pile of purple can lift a festive plate. You can watch a 'how to' video of this super simple FODMAP friendly recipe here

Low FODMAP Christmas Red Cabbage Recipe

Serves 6

Prep – 15 minutes

250g shredded red cabbage, (core removed, shredded in 5mm slices)

6 tbsp. (90ml) water

2 tbsp. non-brewed condiment or cider vinegar

20g butter

¼ tsp. mixed spice

2 tsp. dark muscavado sugar

Large pinch of salt flakes

Large pinch of ground white pepper

 

Rinse the red cabbage and place in a small-ish lidded pan with all the other ingredients. Cover with the lid and bring to the boil over a high heat. Immediately it has started boiled turn it down to a low simmer for 10 minutes.

Remove the lid and simmer for a little longer (around 5 minutes) until the water has evaporated and the cabbage is glossy. Keep an eye on the cabbage, as it is important the pan doesn’t boil dry and burn the sugar. Remove to a warm serving dish.

 

 

Spinach Pasta with Roasted Vegetables and Feta Cheese - Low-FODMAP, gluten-free and very hurried!

Looks a bit lumpy but then again, so do I!   

Looks a bit lumpy but then again, so do I!

 

This very quick recipe accompanies the very quick video ‘Spinach Pasta with Roasted Veg and Feta Cheese’. So hurried in fact I didn’t have time to write ‘vegetables’. Some teatimes are destined for lateness – children’s clubs only need to slide by ten minutes and the next thing you know it’s 7.30 and everyone’s looking famished.

 

In my book ‘Our House For Tea’ (did I mention I’ve written a book?!) I extol the virtues of pre-roasting your vegetables. Specifically useful for a very late teatime when your diet doesn’t allow you the luxury of ordering a takeaway. Without wishing to sound like an infomercial, the gluten-free spinach pasta available in my shop is the marvellous – it gives you a bit of green goodness as well as not falling apart in the boiling process. Free-from mono and diglycerides of fatty acids – what are these and when did most of the supermarkets and big brands decide it was such a good idea to change their pasta recipes to be full of them?! Sorry it’s my current bugbear – the pastas were perfectly serviceable before but there’s something about mono and diglycerides of fatty acids that the Little Miss and I cannot tolerate. Grrr.. Anyway my lovely green pasta contains nothing but rice, spinach and water.

What follows below isn’t so much of a recipe as a guide of things to throw together for a ten-minute teatime. Serve with whatever salad or vegetables you can knock up in the 5-8 minutes it takes the pasta to boil. We have ½ corncobs and lettuce.

Prep 10 minutes.

1 x 250g pack of spinach fusilli pasta

1 x 400g portion of ready roasted vegetables

1 x 200g block feta cheese (we make sure ours is sheep or goat milk)

Start boiling the pasta according to the packet. Start heating the roasted vegetables through in a microwave. Warm a serving dish. When the pasta is cooked, allow to drain and place the vegetables in the pan. Add the pasta back in then crumble in the feta. Add plenty of black pepper before transferring to the warmed serving dish. Boom, tea is served.