fodmap christmas

Low-FODMAP & Gluten-free Quick Christmas Pudding Recipe

Gone are the days of a Christmas pudding: heavy, rich and laden with pounds of FODMAP fruit and rum. The curious thing is that the only person mourning this loss seems to be me! The children were never keen on Christmas pudding and my husband is more a cake person.

Core of marmalade :-)

Core of marmalade :-)

This pudding is more of a sponge cake. I don’t usually cook cake in a microwave* but in this instance, when every surface in our tiny kitchen is covered in pans and detritus from the main course, I simply don’t have enough hob space to steam a pudding. You can weigh all the ingredients and cream the butter and sugar ahead of time. The final assembly should take no more than 5 minutes. My family love this with custard and the children can cheerfully use the recipe from the Our House For Tea cookbook to take charge of this task. You can see how quickly this comes together in the video here but do please ignore my eyes - I was having some sort of allergic reaction!

Please don’t be confused by the quantities of flour, butter, and sugar! As an example my eggs weighed 124g so I had 124g flour, 124g butter, 62g light muscovado sugar and 62g white sugar. 

Serves 6

40g dried cranberries

2 tbsp. orange juice (not from concentrate)

30g walnut pieces

2 medium eggs

1 tbsp. coconut milk (not canned)

3 tbsp. orange marmalade

½ tsp. mixed spice

½ tsp. ground ginger

¼ tsp. cinnamon

1 tsp. orange extract

Extra butter for greasing the bowl

 

Weigh the eggs and have the same weight of

Soft butter

Gluten-free self-raising flour

 

Halve the weight of the eggs and have the same weight of

Light muscovado sugar

White sugar

 

Place the cranberries in a small bowl and cover with the orange juice and leave to soak. Grease a 2 pint microwave safe basin thoroughly with butter, if you have a lid, grease that too. Otherwise grease a piece of cling film to make a lid. Put the marmalade in the bottom in an even layer.

Cream together the butter and sugars in a mixing bowl using a wooden spoon at first then graduating to an electric hand whisk. When it has become fluffy, whisk in the orange extract. Sift the flour and spices together in a separate bowl.

Lightly beat the eggs in a separate bowl. Add to the butter and sugar with a tablespoon of flour. Whisk thoroughly, scraping down from the sides as necessary. Using a large metal spoon fold in the remaining flour until the mixture is combined. Lightly crush any overly large pieces of walnuts and fold those into the batter along with the cranberry and orange mix.

Place the batter mix on top of the marmalade as evenly as possible. Cover with the greased lid (or greased cling film) and microwave on high (800W Cat E oven) for 6 minutes.

Remove the lid, gently loosen the edges with a palate knife and place your serving plate on top. Turn the plate and pudding over together then remove the basin. Cover any mistakes you made removing the pudding, with holly sprigs or icing sugar.

I had some enquiries about whether it is possible to steam this pudding - it is! Butter a 2 pint pudding basin (one with a lip around the outside edge.) Butter a sheet of greaseproof paper and lay it on top of a sheet of foil. Make a one inch pleat in the middle of the sheets. Place the marmalade then the batter mix in the basin. Cover with the pleated greaseproof paper and foil and tie tightly around the edge with string. It is a good idea to make a string handle to lift it out of the pan with. Steam on a trivet in a large pan of simmering water that comes halfway up the basin. 

After steaming, remove the lid and string. Run a thin palette knife around the edge of the basin and turn out onto your serving dish. These pictures aren't nearly as good as the ones my husband takes but they prove it can be done! You won't have as much of a marmalade core as a marmalade topping. 

 

Christmas Clementine Carrots - A Low-FODMAP and very orange recipe

As much a part of Christmas as Christmas trees and stockings, a bowl of clementines becomes our table centrepiece for most of the festive season. I love it when I am able to get a box of clementines with their glossy green leaves still attached. 

Low FODMAP Christmas Clementine Carrots recipe

Thankfully low-FODMAP, a clementine can add a much needed vitamin C boost to a season peppered with colds and chills. Aside from the pleasing alliteration, this side dish provides a festive twist on my favourite combination of carrot and oranges. Carrots are another Low-FODMAP vegetable that Monash says we can 'eat freely and according to appetite' no less! Please do endeavour to find mace – it adds a delicious nutmeg-y spice to the carrots. If you can only find blade mace, grind it yourself in a pestle and mortar. You can watch a video of how to prepare this FODMAP friendly dish here.

Serves 6-8 as a side dish

Prep 20 mins

500g carrots, peeled and cut into batons

2 clementines

25g butter

100ml water

1/8th tsp. ground mace

Small pinch of ground white pepper

Place the carrots in a lidded pan with 100ml of water. Wash and lightly scrub the clementines to remove any residual wax. Finely grate the zest from one clementine over the carrots and add the juice of both clementines to the pan. Add all the remaining ingredients, cover and bring to the boil. Turn down to a low simmer for 10 minutes to allow the carrots to steam but not burn the juice.

Remove the lid and turn up the heat for 5 minutes to reduce the liquid, taking care not to boil the pan dry. Serve in a warm dish. 

Hot Toddy recipe for cold days and days with colds

Less of a drink, more of a medicine, my hot toddy recipe will have you feeling cosy in no time. Suitable for those occasions when you’re not quite properly poorly but nonetheless, in need of an early night and a blanket. Black peppercorns, ginger, star anise, cinnamon, lemons all have anti-inflammatory, antiseptic or healing properties; the whisky helps you sleep and the spoonful of sugar? Well, it makes the medicine go down!

Hot Toddy recipe low FODMAP

You can miss out the straining stage if you’d prefer but it does make it a little easier to drink! Watch my 'how to' video here.

Makes 1 hot toddy

 

1 whole clove

1 cinnamon stick

½-1tsp brown sugar

1 whole star anise

8 black peppercorns

2 discs of fresh root ginger

1 tsp. lemon juice

6 tbsp. (90ml) almost boiling water

2 tbsp. (30ml) whisky

Slices of unwaxed lemon

Place everything but the whisky and lemon peel in a heatproof glass. Stir with the cinnamon stick until the sugar has dissolved. Allow to stand for 5 minutes. Strain the water into another heatproof glass; add a couple of lemon slices and the whisky, before stirring together with the cinnamon stick. Drink whilst wrapped in a blanket

Christmas Prawn Cocktail Two Ways - Low-FODMAP, gluten-free, quick and easy!

The Little Miss is unreserved in her love for prawns. On his stall our fishmonger actually has a picture of her aged 3 eating prawns. When asked what they’d like for Christmas dinner this year she didn’t miss a beat – “Prawns, lots of prawns”

Which one's prettier? You decide!

Which one's prettier? You decide!

I like a prawn cocktail for a Christmas dinner starter, yes it may sound twee and dated but so are most of our Christmas traditions. Each year we add a new animal to our nativity scene, this year it’s an armadillo: he’ll sit nicely next to the panda and tiger. There is nothing minimal in our decorations, we like it to be gaudy and exuberant. However, I do like to keep my food prep minimal. I used to shut myself away in the kitchen for what felt like most of Christmas day before I came to my senses and realised I’d actually rather spend the time with the family. These prawn cocktails are definitely minimal in their prep and easy enough for a child to take charge making.

I’ve given you two varieties: in our family the jury is split straight down the middle on which is their favourite variety. I can’t eat mayonnaise so will swap my marie-rose share with the Little Miss for her herbed one. I’ve suggested that a portion is one of each variety but you could just double the quantity if you prefer one to the other. Watch the how to video here

Serves 6

Prep – 15 minutes

12 washed little gem lettuce leaves.

 

Marie-rose version

160g cooked king prawns, dried with kitchen towel

60g mayonnaise

1 tsp. tomato puree

½ tsp. sweet smoked paprika

Large pinch of salt flakes

Very small bunch of chives

Mix the mayonnaise, tomato puree, paprika and salt together in a small bowl. Add the prawns and turn everything over until it is well coated. Arrange 6 of the lettuce leaves on a platter. Spoon the prawn mixture evenly between the lettuce cups. Snip the chives over the top of the prawns.

 

Lemon and herb version

160g cooked king prawns, dried with kitchen towel

2 tbsp. extra virgin olive oil

Finely grated zest of ¼ of an unwaxed lemon

1 tbsp. lemon juice

1 heaped tbsp. finely chopped parsley

Pinch of salt flakes

Freshly ground black pepper to taste

Mix everything but the prawns together in a small bowl until well combined. Add the prawns and turn everything over until it is well coated. Arrange 6 of the lettuce leaves on a platter. Spoon the prawn mixture evenly between the lettuce cups.

 

 

 

Sprouts, Courgette & Pancetta - Recipe to stretch your 2 Low-FODMAP sprouts at Christmas

Is there any vegetable more crucial to the Christmas dinner than the humble but unfortunately high FODMAP Brussels sprout? Even those who dislike sprouts see it as vital that there should be sprouts on the table. I am, or was, a great sprout lover but a low-FODMAP safe serving is a measly 2 sprouts. I was left with the riddle of how to make my duo of sprouts go further and seem like I was eating more. Challenge accepted.

It's important they still look sprouty.

It's important they still look sprouty.

Pancetta is a great partner to sprouts; the courgette can bulk up the greenery without overwhelming the sprout flavour. By shredding the sprouts lengthways the leaves should stay together enough to stay recognisable as sprouts. There is a joke about people who put their Christmas sprouts on to boil in October so all you have is a smelly mush. This dish is the antithesis of that meme: it takes minutes to make and can be thrown together just before serving. You can see how quickly it comes together in this video.

Serves 6 as a side dish

Prep – 15 minutes

 

1 tbsp. olive oil

140g diced pancetta

200g courgette diced into 5mm pieces

12 sprouts, sliced thinly lengthways

3 tbsp. water

30g butter

2 tbsp. chopped parsley

Freshly ground black pepper to taste

 

Warm the olive oil in a wide lidded pan over a medium-high heat. Add the pancetta and fry for 3 – 3 ½ minutes, stirring often, until the fat is a golden brown and starting to render down. Throw in the sprouts and courgettes and gently turn over so as not to break up the sprouts.

Add 3 tbsp. of water cover and cook for 4 minutes, stirring occasionally. Add the butter, turn over again and remove from the heat. Gently stir in the parsley and pepper. Remove to a warm serving dish.

 

 

Perfect Roast Potatoes and Parsnips - low-FODMAP, gluten-free, crispy and golden.

A perfect roast potato is for life, not just for Christmas. I make my low-FODMAP roasties a little more festive by adding parsnips – this can help your Christmas cooking schedule, as you just need one roasting tray. Although I enjoy a maple roast parsnip as much as the next glutton, I find maple is one flavour too many on an already rich and flavourful Christmas plate. Both parsnips and potatoes have the Monash listing of 'FODMAPs were not detected in this food. Eat freely and according to appetite' - there you go guys, get roasting!

Perfect low FODMAP Roast Potatoes and Parsnips

 

You can peel and chop the potatoes and parsnips the night before and keep in separate pans of water. Do not soak them together as the parsnips will flavour the potatoes. Soaking the veg will remove some of their starchiness and make for a crispier roast potato. If you wish to be even more prepared, then you can also par-boil the veg the night before. Allow the steam to escape and fully cool before keeping in a cold place. You can substitute sunflower oil for the goose fat but it won’t be as crispy.

So here you are, crispy and golden on the outside, fluffy and sweet inside, I give you my perfect low-FODMAP roast potatoes and parsnips. You can watch my how-to guide here.

 

Serves 6

Prep 15 minutes + 1 hour roasting

1.5kg Maris Piper potatoes

500g parsnips

2 pinches of table salt

5 tablespoons goose fat

Small bunch of thyme

Pinch of sea salt flakes

 

Pre-heat the oven to 200°C/ 185°C Fan oven.

Peel the potatoes and parsnips. Cut the potatoes into similar sized pieces (if you want to be exact, each piece is between 35g and 45g!) Cut the parsnips into similar sized pieces, I usually cut the thick piece into two and the longer stem whole. See my video for a guide. Either soak the potatoes and parsnips in separate pans of cold water overnight or give them a rinse to remove some of the starch.

Change the water in the pans and add a large pinch of salt to each pan. Bring to the boil. Once boiling, boil the parsnips for 4 minutes and the potatoes for 8 minutes. Drain separately in a colander. Allow the veg to cool slightly and the steam to escape. Place the goose fat in a large, heavy-duty roasting tray and pop into the oven for a minute.

Place a lid over the colander and give the potatoes and parsnips and shake to rough up the edges. When the fat is smoking hot remove from the oven. Using a spoon, very carefully add the potatoes and parsnips. Turn everything over in the pan until it is fully coated in goose fat and in one even layer. Scatter the thyme stalks over the top of the potatoes and parsnips and return to the oven for 45 minutes.

After 45 minutes check in on the potatoes and turn over to ensure maximum crispiness. Return to the oven for a further 15 minutes, remove the thyme stalks and place into a warmed dish - I like my potatoes and parsnips to be piled high. Scrunch the sea salt flakes over the top. 

Low-FODMAP Red Cabbage for Christmas - a deep purple recipe

Red cabbage can be difficult to navigate on the Low-FODMAP diet. Although a ‘safe’ serving of red cabbage is 80g, I would struggle with this amount. Whether it’s the fibre or an extreme reaction to the oligo-fructans, any brassica in large quantities can poleaxe me. The reaction does seem slightly less severe when the cabbage is cooked. Also, I really need that deep purple on my Christmas plate. Whether you’re having goose, turkey or ham this slightly aromatic, sweet pile of purple can lift a festive plate. You can watch a 'how to' video of this super simple FODMAP friendly recipe here

Low FODMAP Christmas Red Cabbage Recipe

Serves 6

Prep – 15 minutes

250g shredded red cabbage, (core removed, shredded in 5mm slices)

6 tbsp. (90ml) water

2 tbsp. non-brewed condiment or cider vinegar

20g butter

¼ tsp. mixed spice

2 tsp. dark muscavado sugar

Large pinch of salt flakes

Large pinch of ground white pepper

 

Rinse the red cabbage and place in a small-ish lidded pan with all the other ingredients. Cover with the lid and bring to the boil over a high heat. Immediately it has started boiled turn it down to a low simmer for 10 minutes.

Remove the lid and simmer for a little longer (around 5 minutes) until the water has evaporated and the cabbage is glossy. Keep an eye on the cabbage, as it is important the pan doesn’t boil dry and burn the sugar. Remove to a warm serving dish.

 

 

Low-FODMAP Mini Mont Blanc - Gluten-free and Christmassy

They may not look like any mountain you've seen but they certainly taste better!

They may not look like any mountain you've seen but they certainly taste better!

Chestnuts don’t always have to be roasting on an open fire at Christmas: they can be sweetened and piled into tiny, mountain-shaped meringues, with cream and chocolate, for a low-FODMAP, gluten-free pudding. You don’t have to make your own meringues. If you do, you can simply shape dollop-y nests, using a dessertspoon instead of piping, although this seems like a missed opportunity to easily impress. You can see from the video that my FODMAP friendly mini Mont Blanc require very little skill!

Most people with IBS can tolerate 60g of whipped cream. Chestnut puree is made with boiled chestnuts, this serving is well within the low-FODMAP safe serving of 168g. Do check the ingredients for any rogue FODMAPs. If you can get ready sweetened puree from Clement Faugier, please do, it’s delicious! Otherwise I have given you a recipe to make your own. Depending on the size of your egg white you may have some cream and chestnut left over - I call these a breakfast bonus.

It is easier to use a stand mixer to whisk the eggs. You can use a handheld electric whisk but it would take a very long time if you were to use a balloon whisk. When you lift the whisk out of the whisked egg white, and it holds its shape in peaks, you have reached the stiff peak stage. When the cream holds its shape briefly before flopping over, you have reached the soft peak stage.

Meringues

1 medium egg, separated.

1.5 x caster sugar to the weight of egg whites

(My egg white weighed 32g so I used 48g of caster sugar)

150g whipping cream (do not use double cream)

50g plain chocolate

Either

150g of sweetened chestnut puree 

or

150g of unsweetened chestnut puree

½ tsp. vanilla extract

3 tbsp. icing sugar

Preheat a non-fan oven to 120°C - you will need to watch the oven temperature like a hawk. Line a baking sheet with non-stick baking paper. Place a piping bag, fitted with a large rosette nozzle, upright, in a tall glass.

Ensure your bowl is dry and entirely free-from all traces of grease. Whisk the egg whites until they form stiff peaks. Add the caster sugar one tablespoon at a time, whisking well inbetween to make sure all the sugar is combined. Stop when the meringue is looking thick, peaky and glossy. Fill the piping bag with the meringue. When piping it is really important you squeeze from the top down and not the middle.

Pipe the meringues onto the lined baking sheet in 5cm nests: it’s easier to start piping from the middle outwards and finish with an extra swirl around the outside edge. Bake in the middle of the oven for 1 hour.

The meringues will be ready when they lift away from the paper. Remove from the oven and allow to cool for half an hour on the baking sheet.

If you are using unsweetened puree, beat all the ingredients together until smooth. Fill a piping bag fitted with a small nozzle (2mm is ideal) with the now-sweetened chestnut puree. Whip the cream until it reaches a soft peak stage, fill a piping bag with the same nozzle you used to pipe the meringues.

Lay the meringues on a platter. Pipe in some chestnut puree in the base of the nests, then cover with piped cream. Top the cream with squiggles of chestnut puree in a haphazard, craggy design. Finally grate the chocolate over the tops. These will get sticky and soft as they stand so try to serve within the hour. Alternatively, make all the elements separately and assemble at the last minute.

FODMAP friendly gluten free mini mont blanc dessert recipe