family recipe

Slow Cooked Pork Shoulder Steaks with Low-FODMAP Vegetable Sauce

Early spring and slow-cooking go hand in glove. It’s cold and it can sometimes be a struggle to ever remember what it’s like to have a light evenings. In the evening you need a meal to be ready on your return, welcoming you back with its warming aromas. This easy dish is ideal for rice, jacket potatoes, mash or even poured over crusty low-FODMAP bread.

You can use chicken, beef or vegetable stock, do check the ingredients for high FODMAP's if you are not using homemade. If you do not have a slow cooker bake in a heavy lidded casserole at 160°C for 3-4 hours. Use 400ml of stock, checking regularly to make sure it doesn’t dry out.

That's some parsnip puree hiding in the background.

That's some parsnip puree hiding in the background.

Serves 4

1 tbsp. garlic oil

250g carrots

4 pork shoulder steaks (around 600g)

10 sprigs of thyme

480g tomatoes

250ml stock

Large pinch of salt flakes

Freshly ground black pepper to taste.

Peel and slice the carrots. Slice the tomatoes into 4 horizontally. Cut out the stalk from each top slice of each tomato. Warm the oil in a frying pan over a medium high heat. Fry the carrots, stirring often for 3 minutes. Put the carrots in the slow cooker. Fry the shoulder steaks off in the frying pan for one minute each side. Place the steaks on top of the carrots. Add the tomatoes to the frying pan and fry for a minute on each side. Scatter the thyme sprigs and salt flakes over the steaks then cover with the tomatoes. Return the pan to the heat and pour in the stock. Scrape any stuck-on juices from the bottom of the pan into the stock and pour into the slow-cooker.

Cook on low for 8-9 hours. Using a fish slice or slotted spoon, gently lift the steaks out of the vegetables onto a warm plate. They may break up a little but you can reassemble on the plate. Remove the woody thyme sprigs from the vegetables. Using a hand-held blender, whizz up everything left in the slow-cooker until smooth. Season to taste. Serve the steaks with the sauce poured over the top – yum!

Low-FODMAP servings

Common tomato – 119g

Pork –

Garlic Oil - Oil should be infused with garlic to keep the FODMAP’s out!

Thyme, salt, pepper – FODMAP safe

Carrots – FODMAP’s are not detected in this food. Eat freely and according to appetite

 

Hearty Adaptable Soup-Stew with Turmeric - Low-FODMAP recipe

A winter-warmer I’ve been eating at any given opportunity. Although the recipe seems like a very basic vegetable soup, the herbs and spices all have their nutritional place.

I deliberately don’t add the ‘protein of choice’ until the end. You can portion up the soup and freeze for quick, filling lunches. By adding your protein just before serving, you can ring the changes and have a different lunch each time; simply re-heat the soup-stew and stir in. We still have air-dried ham leftover from Christmas which I diced up to use for the picture. You can of course use a mixture of several proteins. I hope you will experiment and see how adaptable this soup is!

Serves 6

1 litre stock chicken, beef or vegetable stock or if you have some, bone broth.

1 tbsp. coconut oil

240g carrots, peeled and diced

220g parsnips, peeled and diced

Thyme, 5 sprigs

440g potato, peeled and diced (all rounders, such as Desiree)

2 tomatoes, each cut into 8

3 sage leaves, shredded

½ tsp. ground black pepper

¼ tsp. sea salt flakes

3 sage leaves shredded

½ tsp. turmeric

Very large handful of curly leaf parsley finely chopped (30g of leaves)

 

The following measures are given per person. Add to heat through, before serving.

70g chopped, cooked chicken, beef, ham, turkey or pork

46g well rinsed, canned lentils

42g well rinsed, canned chickpeas

40g air-dried ham

 

Warm the coconut oil in a large pan over a medium high heat. Add the carrots, parsnips and thyme sprigs, and cook for 3 minutes, stirring regularly. Add the potatoes, tomatoes, sage, turmeric, pepper and salt before cooking and stirring for a further 2 minutes, making sure it doesn’t catch on the bottom of the pan. Stir in stock, cover and bring to the boil before turning down to a simmer for 20 minutes. Remove the woody thyme stalks. The soup will be cooked now but if it needs to stand for a while, it won’t harm, the flavours will simply mellow together.

If you are freezing this, stir in the parsley and cool fully before portioning it up. If you are serving now, add your chosen protein to heat through and stir in the parsley at the last minute.

Low-FODMAP servings

Parsnip - Eat freely and according to appetite – suggested serving 62g.

Carrot – Eat freely and according to appetite – suggested serving 61g.

Potato - Eat freely and according to appetite – suggested serving 122g.

Tomato – Common, eat freely and according to appetite – suggested serving 119g.

Canned chickpeas – 42g

Canned lentils – 46g

Meat is high in protein and does not contain carbohydrates. Check ingredients of processed meats for high-FODMAP ingredients.

Low-FODMAP Cheese and 'Onion' Potato Bake - Yes, FODMAP friendly onion flavoured recipe!

ONION?! A low-FODMAP blog suggesting an onion recipe? Have I not read the guidelines?!

Well yes dear readers I know the guidelines but I also know that oil and water don’t mix. The FODMAPs in onion responsible for making our tummies miserable are oligos-fructans and they remain in the water of the onion (or garlic). By infusing oil with onions and then discarding the onions, the oligos-fructans stay with the water, in the onion, in the bin. There are many how-to videos about how to infuse oil all over the internet. (No-nonsense eHow example hereYou can certainly use the oil straight away but do take care particularly when making your own garlic oil. It is fine to use straight away but there is a risk of botulism if you store it for more than 3 days. 

Although I use shop-bought garlic infused oil regularly, onion oil is one I have to make. Imagine how thrilled I was to receive a bottle of Cobram's roasted onion infused extra virgin olive oil, bringing Australian sunshine to our British chilly midwinter. I love ‘playing’ with new ingredients, one of my little games tasted just like cheese and onion crisps – I didn’t realise that I had even missed cheese and onion crisps! Realising whatever I was going to do with the oil was now going to have to include cheese, I set to work.

Crunchy on top, squidgy in the middle.

Crunchy on top, squidgy in the middle.

You can get ahead of yourself and boil the potatoes the day before. The dish involves very little effort, 20 minutes boiling, 15 minutes baking and only 3 minutes actively assembling. I simply serve this with a Help-Yourself Salad Platter, which can be prepped while the potatoes bake. You should also know, this makes delicious leftover-lunches.

1 kg charlotte potatoes (you could also use Jersey Royals, or another waxy new potato)

240g mature Cheddar cheese, grated

1 tbsp. extra virgin olive oil

3 tbsp. onion infused extra virgin olive oil

1 tsp. fresh thyme leaves

Freshly ground black pepper

Pre-heat a standard oven to 240°C. Boil then simmer, the whole potatoes for 15-20 minutes until they are tender to a knife-point. Drain the potatoes then stand them in a colander for 5 minutes to cool and dry.

In a large baking dish (mine measures 28cm x 19cm), put the olive oil with one tablespoon of the onion oil. Tip the dish to cover the base in the oil. Tumble the potatoes into the dish and press lightly with a potato masher until the skins have burst and there is an even layer of crushed potatoes. Sprinkle over two thirds of the cheese, the thyme, the remaining onion oil and black pepper to taste. Using your hand, turn everything over until it is thoroughly jumbled. Sprinkle over the remaining cheese.

Bake for 15 minutes, until the top is golden and crunchy. 

Low-FODMAP servings

Potato - Eat freely and according to appetite – suggested serving 122g.

Cheddar Cheese – 40g

Olive Oil is high in fat and does not contain carbohydrates.

 

Spinach Pasta with Roasted Vegetables and Feta Cheese - Low-FODMAP, gluten-free and very hurried!

Looks a bit lumpy but then again, so do I!   

Looks a bit lumpy but then again, so do I!

 

This very quick recipe accompanies the very quick video ‘Spinach Pasta with Roasted Veg and Feta Cheese’. So hurried in fact I didn’t have time to write ‘vegetables’. Some teatimes are destined for lateness – children’s clubs only need to slide by ten minutes and the next thing you know it’s 7.30 and everyone’s looking famished.

 

In my book ‘Our House For Tea’ (did I mention I’ve written a book?!) I extol the virtues of pre-roasting your vegetables. Specifically useful for a very late teatime when your diet doesn’t allow you the luxury of ordering a takeaway. Without wishing to sound like an infomercial, the gluten-free spinach pasta available in my shop is the marvellous – it gives you a bit of green goodness as well as not falling apart in the boiling process. Free-from mono and diglycerides of fatty acids – what are these and when did most of the supermarkets and big brands decide it was such a good idea to change their pasta recipes to be full of them?! Sorry it’s my current bugbear – the pastas were perfectly serviceable before but there’s something about mono and diglycerides of fatty acids that the Little Miss and I cannot tolerate. Grrr.. Anyway my lovely green pasta contains nothing but rice, spinach and water.

What follows below isn’t so much of a recipe as a guide of things to throw together for a ten-minute teatime. Serve with whatever salad or vegetables you can knock up in the 5-8 minutes it takes the pasta to boil. We have ½ corncobs and lettuce.

Prep 10 minutes.

1 x 250g pack of spinach fusilli pasta

1 x 400g portion of ready roasted vegetables

1 x 200g block feta cheese (we make sure ours is sheep or goat milk)

Start boiling the pasta according to the packet. Start heating the roasted vegetables through in a microwave. Warm a serving dish. When the pasta is cooked, allow to drain and place the vegetables in the pan. Add the pasta back in then crumble in the feta. Add plenty of black pepper before transferring to the warmed serving dish. Boom, tea is served.