Recipe

Buttered Fish Broth - Low-FODMAP recipe

Thankfully butter is low-FODMAP and I feel no fear about throwing it into my food at the slightest opportunity. If you are a ghee advocate then do please substitute for the butter. The benefit of this dish is that it does not require a fish stock. As the hot water reduces it almost emulsifies with the butter to turn it a delicate, primrose yellow. The flavour will intensify as it reduces. As an addendum, I have made this with a frozen fish portions putting the frozen fish straight into the water. I can’t say it has altered the flavour at all, but it has made my life easier when I’ve forgotten to defrost any fish! I’ve given you the recipe for 2 portions, as I’ve realised not all of you are feeding a family of four, but you can easily multiply the recipe. I serve this on its own for a light meal or in a bowl over rice for a main meal, (see picture for both options). If you can find some good low-FODMAP crusty bread, it works as a delicious mop for the yellowy broth. 

In light of the news of vegetable shortages, I've had to rethink this month's recipes! If you cannot find baby spinach, look for some homegrown perpetual spinach. It will need a good wash, tough stems removing and a slightly longer cooking time but will still be terrifically good for you.

Right-hand bowl is without rice, left-hand bowl is with rice

Right-hand bowl is without rice, left-hand bowl is with rice

2 portions of firm white fish such as haddock or cod each weighing between 120g-150g

700ml water

Bay leaf

2 large sprigs of thyme

8 peppercorns

40g butter

120g peeled diced carrot

70g baby leaf spinach

Small handful of basil, shredded

Salt and freshly ground black pepper for seasoning

 

If you are serving with rice, start cooking this while you prepare the broth. Warm two soup bowls.

Place the fish in a medium sized pan with the bay leaf, peppercorns, thyme and water. Bring to the boil, cover and turn down to a simmer for 6-7 minutes, until the fish flakes easily. It is difficult to be exact, as the cooking time will depend on the thickness of the fillet.

Using a slotted spoon, remove the fish from the pan and place in a soup bowl. Skim out and discard the peppercorns and bay leaf from the water. Add the butter and carrots to the pan and bring to the boil, uncovered. Reduce the water by half, stirring occasionally to blend the butter. Meanwhile, flake the fish by hand, removing any skin or bones

When the broth has reduced, stir in the spinach and basil. Cover and allow to wilt for a minute. Remove from the heat. Take out the woody thyme sprigs but leave any thyme leaves. Add the flaked fish back into the pan then taste and adjust the seasoning. If you are using rice, place a portion in each bowl before sharing the broth between the bowls.

Low-FODMAP servings

Fish is high in protein and does not contain carbohydrates.

Butter is high in fat and does not contain carbohydrates.

Carrot – Eat freely and according to appetite – suggested serving 61g.

Spinach – 38g

Basmati rice – 190g (I used 150g of cooked basmati rice as a serving)

Basil – 16g

 

Hearty Adaptable Soup-Stew with Turmeric - Low-FODMAP recipe

A winter-warmer I’ve been eating at any given opportunity. Although the recipe seems like a very basic vegetable soup, the herbs and spices all have their nutritional place.

I deliberately don’t add the ‘protein of choice’ until the end. You can portion up the soup and freeze for quick, filling lunches. By adding your protein just before serving, you can ring the changes and have a different lunch each time; simply re-heat the soup-stew and stir in. We still have air-dried ham leftover from Christmas which I diced up to use for the picture. You can of course use a mixture of several proteins. I hope you will experiment and see how adaptable this soup is!

Serves 6

1 litre stock chicken, beef or vegetable stock or if you have some, bone broth.

1 tbsp. coconut oil

240g carrots, peeled and diced

220g parsnips, peeled and diced

Thyme, 5 sprigs

440g potato, peeled and diced (all rounders, such as Desiree)

2 tomatoes, each cut into 8

3 sage leaves, shredded

½ tsp. ground black pepper

¼ tsp. sea salt flakes

3 sage leaves shredded

½ tsp. turmeric

Very large handful of curly leaf parsley finely chopped (30g of leaves)

 

The following measures are given per person. Add to heat through, before serving.

70g chopped, cooked chicken, beef, ham, turkey or pork

46g well rinsed, canned lentils

42g well rinsed, canned chickpeas

40g air-dried ham

 

Warm the coconut oil in a large pan over a medium high heat. Add the carrots, parsnips and thyme sprigs, and cook for 3 minutes, stirring regularly. Add the potatoes, tomatoes, sage, turmeric, pepper and salt before cooking and stirring for a further 2 minutes, making sure it doesn’t catch on the bottom of the pan. Stir in stock, cover and bring to the boil before turning down to a simmer for 20 minutes. Remove the woody thyme stalks. The soup will be cooked now but if it needs to stand for a while, it won’t harm, the flavours will simply mellow together.

If you are freezing this, stir in the parsley and cool fully before portioning it up. If you are serving now, add your chosen protein to heat through and stir in the parsley at the last minute.

Low-FODMAP servings

Parsnip - Eat freely and according to appetite – suggested serving 62g.

Carrot – Eat freely and according to appetite – suggested serving 61g.

Potato - Eat freely and according to appetite – suggested serving 122g.

Tomato – Common, eat freely and according to appetite – suggested serving 119g.

Canned chickpeas – 42g

Canned lentils – 46g

Meat is high in protein and does not contain carbohydrates. Check ingredients of processed meats for high-FODMAP ingredients.

Low-FODMAP & Gluten-free Quick Christmas Pudding Recipe

Gone are the days of a Christmas pudding: heavy, rich and laden with pounds of FODMAP fruit and rum. The curious thing is that the only person mourning this loss seems to be me! The children were never keen on Christmas pudding and my husband is more a cake person.

Core of marmalade :-)

Core of marmalade :-)

This pudding is more of a sponge cake. I don’t usually cook cake in a microwave* but in this instance, when every surface in our tiny kitchen is covered in pans and detritus from the main course, I simply don’t have enough hob space to steam a pudding. You can weigh all the ingredients and cream the butter and sugar ahead of time. The final assembly should take no more than 5 minutes. My family love this with custard and the children can cheerfully use the recipe from the Our House For Tea cookbook to take charge of this task. You can see how quickly this comes together in the video here but do please ignore my eyes - I was having some sort of allergic reaction!

Please don’t be confused by the quantities of flour, butter, and sugar! As an example my eggs weighed 124g so I had 124g flour, 124g butter, 62g light muscovado sugar and 62g white sugar. 

Serves 6

40g dried cranberries

2 tbsp. orange juice (not from concentrate)

30g walnut pieces

2 medium eggs

1 tbsp. coconut milk (not canned)

3 tbsp. orange marmalade

½ tsp. mixed spice

½ tsp. ground ginger

¼ tsp. cinnamon

1 tsp. orange extract

Extra butter for greasing the bowl

 

Weigh the eggs and have the same weight of

Soft butter

Gluten-free self-raising flour

 

Halve the weight of the eggs and have the same weight of

Light muscovado sugar

White sugar

 

Place the cranberries in a small bowl and cover with the orange juice and leave to soak. Grease a 2 pint microwave safe basin thoroughly with butter, if you have a lid, grease that too. Otherwise grease a piece of cling film to make a lid. Put the marmalade in the bottom in an even layer.

Cream together the butter and sugars in a mixing bowl using a wooden spoon at first then graduating to an electric hand whisk. When it has become fluffy, whisk in the orange extract. Sift the flour and spices together in a separate bowl.

Lightly beat the eggs in a separate bowl. Add to the butter and sugar with a tablespoon of flour. Whisk thoroughly, scraping down from the sides as necessary. Using a large metal spoon fold in the remaining flour until the mixture is combined. Lightly crush any overly large pieces of walnuts and fold those into the batter along with the cranberry and orange mix.

Place the batter mix on top of the marmalade as evenly as possible. Cover with the greased lid (or greased cling film) and microwave on high (800W Cat E oven) for 6 minutes.

Remove the lid, gently loosen the edges with a palate knife and place your serving plate on top. Turn the plate and pudding over together then remove the basin. Cover any mistakes you made removing the pudding, with holly sprigs or icing sugar.

I had some enquiries about whether it is possible to steam this pudding - it is! Butter a 2 pint pudding basin (one with a lip around the outside edge.) Butter a sheet of greaseproof paper and lay it on top of a sheet of foil. Make a one inch pleat in the middle of the sheets. Place the marmalade then the batter mix in the basin. Cover with the pleated greaseproof paper and foil and tie tightly around the edge with string. It is a good idea to make a string handle to lift it out of the pan with. Steam on a trivet in a large pan of simmering water that comes halfway up the basin. 

After steaming, remove the lid and string. Run a thin palette knife around the edge of the basin and turn out onto your serving dish. These pictures aren't nearly as good as the ones my husband takes but they prove it can be done! You won't have as much of a marmalade core as a marmalade topping.